Shall we throw away our microwave ovens day 1

Is Micro-Waved Food Safe?

There are many disputes, arguments but few scientific evidences on this topic. The direct experiments on human being could be hard to carry out. However, it could be much easier to do it on plants.

I will start an experiment right away from today which I will apply city water and microwaved water solely and desperately on two group of grasses. I will observe water impact on grass’s growth and compare the health of grass  between tested group and benchmark group.

I will record all those process with photos and update on internet.

No time wasting, here we go:

1. A glass container was washed clean and be ready to use, I will divide it into two halves.  One side will be for plants with microwaved water, another side will be for plants with city tap water.

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2. To indicate which is which more clearly, I put 4 labels on it.

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3. A bird view of the glass container. Image

4. what plant shall I use? I have some on my backyard. I will plant same grass on each side to show the differences. I will not use too big one nor two small ones. The dark green one looks quite lovely, I will use it.
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5. I will use soil from an used flower basin. I hope it works.
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6. Now soil is inside the glass container/box. Image
7. How to divide it or saperate into two rooms? I find some plastic material I will use it. Image
8. The plastic cover is an ideal divider.
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9. Let me cut it with scissors.
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10. Now the divider is almost ready.
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11. Perfect match!
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12. Let me start to transfer some plants into the container.
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13. Now 3 pairs of plants been moved to glass containers.Sorry I don’t know the names of grass, but we would need the name in future. Let us call the big one A (in dark green needle leaves), medium one B (with round yellow green leaves) and small one C (with standard green oval leaves)
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14.I want to do one more thing. I want to know the impact one seeds. So I have some seeds here.
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15. 4 Seeds in my palm.
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16. Seeds are planted.2 on each side.
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15. Let me put more soil on it.
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16. Now it’s ready.
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17. Let me move it to area with more sunshine.Image
18. water is ready. Same amount from same tap.
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19. One cup is put into microwave.Image
20. Heated for 1 minutes.
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22. It is marked with label. But it is hot, Need to wait until it’s cool down.Image
24. One hour later, after micro waved water cooling down, I pour 2 cups of water into two assigned half. Hope it is not too late. The sunshine hurt the grass a little bit.

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Shall we throw away our microwave ovens?

I got an email from my friend Jai today on an experiment on micro wave water.

It is scary but interesting story. As it’s related to everyone’s life, it is obviously an important topic.

I decide to do the experiment by myself to verify it is a true story or simply a hoax.

I will update frequently on the progress of this experiment.

 

Charles

 

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Below is a Science fair project presented by a girl in a secondary school in Sussex. In it she took filtered water and divided it into two parts.

The first part she heated to boiling in a pan on the stove, and the second part she heated to boiling in a microwave.

Then after cooling she used the water to water two identical plants to see if there would be any difference in the growth between the normal boiled water and the water boiled in a microwave.

She was thinking that the structure or energy of the water may be compromised by microwave.

As it turned out, even she was amazed at the difference, after the experiment which was repeated by her class mates a number of times and had the same result.

It has been known for some years that the problem with microwaved anything is not the radiation people used to worry about, it’s how it corrupts the DNA in the food so the body can not recognize it.

Microwaves don’t work different ways on different substances. Whatever you put into the microwave suffers the same destructive process. Microwaves agitate the molecules to move faster and faster. This movement causes friction which denatures the original make-up of the substance. It results in destroyed vitamins, minerals, proteins and generates the new stuff called radiolytic compounds, things that are not found in nature.

So the body wraps it in fat cells to protect itself from the dead food or it eliminates it fast. Think of all the Mothers heating up milk in these ‘Safe’ appliances. What about the nurse in Canada that warmed up blood for a transfusion patient and accidentally killed him when the blood went in dead. But the makers say it’s safe. But proof is in the pictures of living plants dying!!!

FORENSIC RESEARCH DOCUMENT
Prepared By: William P. Kopp
A. R. E. C. Research Operations
TO61-7R10/10-77F05
RELEASE PRIORITY: CLASS I ROO1a

Ten Reasons to dispose off your Microwave Oven
From the conclusions of the Swiss, Russian and German scientific clinical studies, we can no longer ignore the microwave oven sitting in our kitchens. Based on this research, one can conclude this article with the following:

1). Continually eating food processed from a microwave oven causes long term – permanent – brain damage by ‘shorting out’ electrical impulses in the brain [de-polarizing or de-magnetizing the brain tissue].

2). The human body cannot metabolize [break down]the unknown by-products created in microwaved food.

3). Male and female hormone production is shut down and/or altered by continually eating microwaved foods.

4). The effects of microwaved food by-products are residual [long term, permanent]within the human body.

5). Minerals, vitamins, and nutrients of all microwaved food is reduced or altered so that the human body gets little or no benefit, or the human body absorbs altered compounds that cannot be broken down.

6). The minerals in vegetables are altered into cancerous free radicals when cooked in microwave ovens.

7). Microwaved foods cause stomach and intestinal cancerous growths [tumours]. This may explain the rapidly increased rate of colon cancer in UK and America .

8). The prolonged eating of microwaved foods causes cancerous cells to increase in human blood.

9). Continual ingestion of microwaved food causes immune system deficiencies through lymph gland and blood serum alterations.

10). Eating microwaved food causes loss of memory, concentration, emotional instability, and a decrease of intelligence.
Read more at http://www.the-open-mind.com/microwave-test-an-eye-opener/#P2j8gq3Lx9IzDvKo.99

Let us go for Tai Chi

 

Do you want to learn a sport which you can exercise anywhere any time? A sport which is good for ages between 5 and 105? A sport which is safe and you never need to worry about injuries? A sport which is combination of meditation and medication?  

Fellow toast master and welcomes guests, Tai Chi is the answer.

First of all, is it really good?

According to Kerr, Kerr, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) instructor who has practiced for 15 years.“Doing tai chi makes me feel lighter on my feet,” she says “I’m stronger in my legs, more alert, more focused, and more relaxed—it just puts me in a better mood all around.”  she says that the impact of tai chi on her mood were so noticeable—even after she was diagnosed with a chronic immune system cancer—that she has devoted her professional life to studying the effects of mind-body exercise on the brain at Harvard’s Osher Research Center.

Tai chi is often described as “meditation in motion,” but it might well be called “medication in motion.” There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems such as arthritis, stroke, breast cancer, stroke, Parkinson disease, and hypertension and so on.

As there are 3 million people exercise tai chi in the United States, we have done more on the effect of tai chi on cardiovascular disease, fall prevention, bone health, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis of the knee, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic heart failure, cancer survivors, depression in older people.

Just share a few numbers with you.

  1. Heart failure. In a 30-person pilot study at Harvard Medical School, 12 weeks of tai chi improved participants’ ability to walk and quality of life. It also reduced blood levels of B-type natriuretic protein, an indicator of heart failure.
  2. Hypertension. In a review of 26 studies in English or Chinese published in Preventive Cardiology (Spring 2008), Dr. Yeh reported that in 85% of trials, tai chi lowered blood pressure — with improvements ranging from 3 to 32 mm Hg in systolic pressure and from 2 to 18 mm Hg in diastolic pressure.
  3. Parkinson’s disease. A 33-person pilot study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, published in Gait and Posture (October 2008), found that people with mild to moderately severe Parkinson’s disease showed improved balance, walking ability, and overall well-being after 20 tai chi sessions.

What is Tai chi?

 There are some ancient Chinese philosophy behind Taichi.

Taichi is the fundamental form of universe. Inside the circle, there are yin and yang which are opposite to each other and to be kept in harmony. Femal isYin, male is yang, being harmonized, it is a family, moon is yin and sun is yang, together we have season.  

But yin and yang are never stable, it is flowing. Sometimes husband takes control, some time wife dominates. What drives the flow? Maybe time, maybe information, maybe love, in China, we name it Qi.  If there is no qi, no flow, the family is broken. Inside an egg, yellow is yang, white is yin, when they care cooked, no flow. The egg is dead.

Ok, given those basic principles, the most important part of Tichi is not strength or force but flow. We believe water drops can drill a hole in the stone, the magic lies in flowing.

Ok, finally, I want to talk about how to learn it.

You can learn from books or videos or to find an instructor, but to be honest, it is really hard to learn that way because according to my experience you flow would not be smooth but flow continuality is critical part. You may need an instructor. If you have a neighbor which does it every day, I am sure he will teach you free of charge, and you can do it together

Let us do it now, one movement, name of it is cloud hands.

Start from simple and progress patiently and slowly. If you want to get it one week, you doomed to fail. I learnt it constantly for 6 months. I can feel my progress but it is still far away from fluent.

I wish this gentle form of exercise can prevent or ease many ills of aging and could be the perfect activity for the rest of your life.


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Tai chi for medical conditions

When combined with standard treatment, tai chi appears to be helpful for several medical conditions. For example:

  1.  In a 40-person study at Tufts University, presented in October 2008 at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, an hour of tai chi twice a week for 12 weeks reduced pain and improved mood and physical functioning more than standard stretching exercises in people with severe knee osteoarthritis. According to a Korean study published in December 2008 in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, eight weeks of tai chi classes followed by eight weeks of home practice significantly improved flexibility and slowed the disease process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, a painful and debilitating inflammatory form of arthritis that affects the spine.

Low bone density. A review of six controlled studies by Dr. Wayne and other Harvard researchers indicates that tai chi may be a safe and effective way to maintain bone density in postmenopausal women. A controlled study of tai chi in women with osteopenia (diminished bone density not as severe as osteoporosis) is under way at the Osher Research Center and Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Breast cancer. Tai chi has shown potential for improving quality of life and functional capacity (the physical ability to carry out normal daily activities, such as work or exercise) in women suffering from breast cancer or the side effects of breast cancer treatment. For example, a 2008 study at the University of Rochester, published in Medicine and Sport Science, found that quality of life and functional capacity (including aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and flexibility) improved in women with breast cancer who did 12 weeks of tai chi, while declining in a control group that received only supportive therapy.

Heart disease. A 53-person study at National Taiwan University found that a year of tai chi significantly boosted exercise capacity, lowered blood pressure, and improved levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and C-reactive protein in people at high risk for heart disease. The study, which was published in the September 2008 Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, found no improvement in a control group that did not practice tai chi.

Heart failure. In a 30-person pilot study at Harvard Medical School, 12 weeks of tai chi improved participants’ ability to walk and quality of life. It also reduced blood levels of B-type natriuretic protein, an indicator of heart failure. A 150-patient controlled trial is under way.

  1.  In a review of 26 studies in English or Chinese published in Preventive Cardiology (Spring 2008), Dr. Yeh reported that in 85% of trials, tai chi lowered blood pressure — with improvements ranging from 3 to 32 mm Hg in systolic pressure and from 2 to 18 mm Hg in diastolic pressure.

Parkinson’s disease. A 33-person pilot study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, published in Gait and Posture (October 2008), found that people with mild to moderately severe Parkinson’s disease showed improved balance, walking ability, and overall well-being after 20 tai chi sessions.

Sleep problems. In a University of California, Los Angeles, study of 112 healthy older adults with moderate sleep complaints, 16 weeks of tai chi improved the quality and duration of sleep significantly more than standard sleep education. The study was published in the July 2008 issue of the journal Sleep.

  1.  In 136 patients who’d had a stroke at least six months earlier, 12 weeks of tai chi improved standing balance more than a general exercise program that entailed breathing, stretching, and mobilizing muscles and joints involved in sitting and walking. Findings were published in the January 2009 issue of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.

Photograph by Jim Harrison

Kerr practices outside to “feel the sensations of the sun and wind and the ground beneath my feet.”

 

CATHERINE KERR has found an antidote for the hectic pace of laboratory life in the daily practice of tai chi. This centuries-old Chinese mind-body exercise, now gaining popularity in the United States, consists of slow-flowing, choreographed meditative movements with poetic names like “wave hands like clouds,” “dragons stirring up the wind,” and “swallow skimming the pond” that evoke the natural world. It also focuses on basic components of overall fitness: muscle strength, flexibility, and balance. 

“Doing tai chi makes me feel lighter on my feet,” says Kerr, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) instructor who has practiced for 15 years. “I’m stronger in my legs, more alert, more focused, and more relaxed—it just puts me in a better mood all around.” Although she also practices sitting meditation and does a lot of walking, she says that the impact of tai chi on her mood were so noticeable—even after she was diagnosed with a chronic immune system cancer—that she has devoted her professional life to studying the effects of mind-body exercise on the brain at Harvard’s Osher Research Center.

Kerr is careful to note that tai chi is “not a magic cure-all,” and that Western scientific understanding of its possible physiological benefits is still very rudimentary. Yet her own experience and exposure to research have convinced her that its benefits are very real—especially for older people too frail to engage in robust aerobic conditioning and for those suffering from impaired balance, joint stiffness, or poor kinesthetic awareness. 

For anyone who practices tai chi regularly, “brain plasticity arising from repeated training may be relevant, since we know that brain connections are ‘sculpted’ by daily experience and practice,” explains Kerr, who is investigating brain dynamics related to tai chi and mindfulness meditation at HMS. “Tai chi is a very interesting form of training because it combines a low-intensity aerobic exercise with a complex, learned, motor sequence. Meditation, motor learning, and attentional focus have all been shown in numerous studies to be associated with training-related changes—including, in some cases, changes in actual brain structure—in specific cortical regions.” 

 

SCHOLARS SAY tai chi grew out of Chinese martial arts, although its exact history is not fully understood, according to one of Kerr’s colleagues, assistant professor of medicine Peter M. Wayne, who directs the tai chi and mind-body research program at the Osher Center. “Tai chi’s roots are also intertwined with traditional Chinese medicine and philosophy, especially Taoism, and with another healing mind-body exercise called qigong,” he explains. “Though these roots are thousands of years old, the formal name tai chi chuan was coined as recently as the seventeenth century as a new form of kung fu, which integrates mind-body principles into a martial art and exercise for health.”

Tai chi chuan is often translated as “supreme (grand) ultimate fist”: the first part (“tai chi”) refers to the ubiquitous dialectical interaction of complementary, creative forces in the universe (yin and yang); the second, the fist, is what Wayne describes as the “manifestation or integration of these philosophical concepts into the body.” 

According to traditional Chinese medicine, when yin and yang come together they create a dynamic inner movement. “While practicing, tai chi moves the chi and the blood and the sinews in the body—purportedly correcting health imbalances,” adds Wayne, who has founded The Tree of Life Tai Chi Center, in Somerville, Massachusetts, where he also teaches. “One key principle of tai chi is analogous to the saying ‘A rolling stone gathers no moss,’—if you maintain inner mindful movement in the body, it may improve your health.” 

Tai chi, considered a soft or internal form of martial art, has multiple long and short forms associated with the most popular styles taught: Wu, Yang, and Chen (named for their originators). Plenty of people practice the faster, more combative forms that appear to resemble kung fu, but the slower, meditative movements are what many in the United States—where the practice has gained ground during the last 25 years—commonly think of as tai chi. 

Qigong, sometimes called the “grammar” of tai chi, comprises countless different smaller movements and breathing exercises that are often incorporated into a tai chi practice. “One reason tai chi is popular is that it is adaptable and safe for people of all ages and stages of health,” Wayne points out. “Recent tai chi forms have even been developed for individuals to practice in wheelchairs. And although few formal medical-economic analyses have been conducted, tai chi appears to be relatively cost-effective.”

 SURVEYS, including one by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (http://nccam.nih.gov/health/taichi), have shown that between 2.3 million and 3 million people use tai chi in the United States, where a fledgling body of scientific research now exists: the center has supported studies on the effect of tai chi on cardiovascular disease, fall prevention, bone health, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis of the knee, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic heart failure, cancer survivors, depression in older people, and symptoms of fibromyalgia. One study on the immune response to varicella-zoster virus (which causes shingles) suggested in 2007 that tai chi may enhance the immune system and improve overall well-being in older adults. However, “in general, studies of tai chi have been small, or they have had design limitations that may limit their conclusions,” notes the center’s website. “The cumulative evidence suggests that additional research is warranted and needed before tai chi can be widely recommended as an effective therapy.”

Most recently, Wayne and his fellow researchers have focused on balance issues and on cardiovascular and bone health—areas where tai chi’s benefits have begun to be evaluated most rigorously. “We’ve conducted systematic reviews of the literature, and in older people there is sound evidence that suggests tai chi can improve balance and reduce risks for falls, which have significant consequences on public health, particularly given our aging population,” he reports. 

Wayne points to a study by Fuzhong Li at the Oregon Research Institute (which carries out assessments of tai chi’s impact on health conditions, including a current project with Parkinson’s patients): it looked at 256 elderly people, from 70 to 92 years old, and compared how they benefited from tai chi and seated exercise, respectively. “They reported greater than a 40 percent reduction in the number of falls in the group that received tai chi,” Wayne reports. “This is a very significant finding. Older people with thinning bones are at very high risk for fractures; a fall related to hip fracture, for example, is associated with a 20 percent increase in mortality within one year and very high medical costs.”  

Studies conducted in Asia have reported that tai chi may benefit women with thinning bones. This has led Wayne and his colleagues to pursue another current research project—a randomized controlled trial with post-menopausal women diagnosed with osteopenia that examines bone density markers as well as computerized motion analysis to quantify how tai chi affects weight-bearing in the skeleton. 

In addition, clinical trials and basic research studies on patients with heart failure “suggest tai chi may be of benefit to patients in terms of greater exercise capacity and quality of life,” Wayne continues. “More definitive studies to confirm these observations are under way, as well as pilot studies with patients with chronic pulmonary disease.” 

Yet from a Western scientific standpoint, it’s difficult to pinpoint why and how tai chi affects us. In typical drug trials, a well-defined chemical compound targets physiological systems, and outcomes can be measured against placebo controls. But tai chi is a multicomponent intervention, Wayne notes, with many active ingredients—movement, breathing, attention, visualization, and rich psychosocial interactions with teachers and other students. All of these can affect many physiological systems simultaneously. Moreover, many of the older study subjects also have complex chronic conditions, so identifying a logical control is challenging: it’s just not possible to have a placebo in a tai chi study. “For these reasons,” he says, “we need to be creative in designing tai chi trials, and cautious in interpreting the results.” 

 

HMS INSTRUCTOR and pathologist Marie-Helene Jouvin, who has practiced tai chi for a decade and teaches at the Brookline Tai Chi school near Boston (http://brooklinetaichi.org), has noticed the large number of students who attend classes there for medical reasons—after surgery, or if they are suffering from chronic or autoimmune diseases. But tai chi and qigong are not limited to being done in a classroom with a teacher, she adds. “They can be done when you are sick, or lying in bed.” 

Indeed, Wayne, Jouvin, and Kerr all agree that the beauty and ease of tai chi offer multifold benefits as far as its daily practice: it is adaptable to numerous physical positions and requires no special equipment, expensive outfits, or specific athletic conditioning. “It’s not a high-cardio workout, it’s all about deepening the relaxation in the movement,” Kerr says. “In aerobic exercise we’re taught to tense the muscle and push hard. Tai chi is the opposite approach; it’s about the flow of the whole body in the movement.” 

Like tai chi, qigong also accomodates busy schedules because it can be done incrementally—and sometimes involves only the smallest parts of the body. Jouvin, for example, sometimes performs an ultra-slow form of twiddling the thumbs under the table at meetings; she focuses on the minutest sensations—skin, heat, joint rotation, relationships among the clasped and moving fingers—and finds this tends to calm her down, especially during heated professional debates, she says with a smile. “These are things you can easily do to help yourself and focus,” she adds. 

Perhaps because of these multiple forms and its adaptability, tai chi looks easy to do. Yet in demonstrating to a novice the most basic short form of the Wu style, Jouvin painstakingly explains 18 precisely choreographed movements that flow together in a set order and take about four minutes to complete properly. “It’s hard to assess if you are doing it correctly without having a trained teacher or practitioner helping you,” she acknowledges. “It can look like people waving their arms and legs around.” 

At the Brookline school, this same Wu short form is taught during the course of 21 weeks of classes. “Most beginners will do the moves as if they were purely aerobic exercise,” Jouvin says. “It will take a while for them to feel the exercise internally. There seems to be an internal logic to the movements. It’s a form that was built over centuries and probably reflects how the body functions.” 

A Live Supply Chain Project: premium wiper blades @ $6, delivered to door

 

 

I like challenge.

Life is boring if there is no  challenge.  It is a game.

For instance, let us just have a look at our  wiper blades . Though it is  just a small piece of auto part, but do we really need to pay $20-30 for a pair?

It is not about money. It is about supply chain optimization.

As an ordinary end user, a 8-dollar high quality wipers seems impossible.  Remember, I am not talking about those junk quality products. As in most stores, the high quality blades are sold at over $16,  better brand and longer size one could be sold @ 23.99. If you have ever buy one, you should know it. Moreover, if you get your wiper blades replaced in those stores/maintenance shop, you may have to pay labor plus tax,  one guy told me he paid more than $60 for a pair of wiper blades.

Do we have power to negotiate or talk about price? No.  I cannot. Did you try?

But on the other hand, theoretically it should be possible to lower down the cost significantly. You know, if we weigh the wipers, it is less than 1 kg,  roughly, cost of 0.5 kg steel plus rubber should be less than $0.75, plus manufacturing cost, it should be less than $1.50.

Actually you may realize that the crazy cost driver lies in delivery. Check with those trucking company or a courier on what cost of delivery from downtown to your home, the cost could be $10 to $15. So even if the wiper itself cost 0 dollars, you still have no chance to get a wiper blades of $6.00.

wipers photo

At the moment, it seems there is no solutions. But I have confidence, I believe the power of internet, power of social network, I believe if everyone work together, we can achieve it!

Cheater in Time square, New York

Cheater in Time square, New York

The left guy in dark yellow monk suit wondered on street around Times square of New York City. His cheating procedure:
1. he will pray and say “peace” before you with a pray posture( at the moment, you may think he is a true monk);
2. you may pray and show same posture as he did(at the moment, you may be moved by his devotion to world peace);
3. he send you a cheap pearl bracelet to you (at the moment, you may think it is free);
4. you may say thank you(you are polite);
5. he then say thank you (you may think he is polite);
6. then he takes out a note book and ask for your registration ( you may think it is not necessary)
7. Then he will ask for your donation (you may feel obliged)

I don’t think he is a true monk. True monks never do this and should be free of hair actually -not wearing hat like this guy!

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